Monday, 31 January 2011

Pirate Box – Mobile File sharing network

Essentially the PirateBox is an open WiFi network that anyone nearby can anonymously join. Once connected, users can upload and download any files they please, creating a temporary and portable file sharing network.

The system utilizes Free, Libre and Open Source software (FLOSS) to create mobile wireless file sharing networks where users can anonymously share images, video, audio, documents, and other digital content.

The device, originally called Freedrop was built by David Darts a professor at NYU Steinhart for his students to share files. Quickly the students started sharing non class related material such as music or images. The device was placed in a pirate themed lunchbox, which led to the name Pirate Box.


(Credit: David Darts)

Making one of these devices yourself isn’t hard. The components needed can be bought for around US 100$.
Detailed instructions on how to make this device can be found in the Pirate Box Wiki.

Similar things can be achieved in many phones running android or symbian already, as in essence this is mostly a free wireless web server in a box. The important thing is that there is no connection to the rest of the internet. The Pirate box is a network in itself.


Opinions? 
Does anyone know of any other projects similar to this?

43 comments:

  1. Interesting, sounds dangerous too

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  2. Hahaha... this is awesome. Free information. The world will have to learn to live with pirates. People need to stop calling them thieves--they are copyright infringers. There is a difference. If you think about it, you can't "steal" information. It's intangible... non-material.

    Great post. I don't know of any other projects like it though--first time I had heard of this.

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  3. Yeah, I see it with mixed feelings. Although it's true that not nearly everybody who downloads a song, a book or a movie would have paid for it, the ones who probably would have should pay and buy the stuff, especially when the artists are not that well known. When they start a career, they get paid only a fraction, most of it takes the corporation who has them on contract. So if the artists get even less money, many will stop doing it and get a regular job instead, just in order to survive. Corporatins will only publish what is known to make some money, take no risks, and artists will produce with a minimum of creativity and effort. So if you like something, make sure to give the artists some money.

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  4. This man is right.
    Artists earn more from shows and concerts, so go to those, buy their merchandise, and if they are with independant lables buy music from there. Most mainstream lables will take the large share of income from music sales while also restricting artists creatively.

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  5. so basically its like a wifi-thumbdrive?

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  6. That's a good idea! But wifi networks are too small, too local. They can work in one building, but not larger. And the sharing principle makes it so vulnerable - It's OK in trusted grups, But not wider.

    Follwing!

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  7. Interesting, never heard of it before.

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  8. That is so cool! nice blog, following

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  9. Interesting dude. Never heard of it.

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  10. reminds me of the 'flash drive in the wall' idea which was eventually discarded due to too many virus's being uploaded to them, both intentionally and unintentionally...

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  11. cool concept. i wish i had places near me where i could access things like this

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  12. is this like dropbox? anyway, it's always good when you can share something with your friends

    also, following now

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  13. loving the design and concept. i'd buy it just because its cleverly named.

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  14. i know this project !! read somes articles from David Darts fews day ago, i will find the website and post links asap

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  15. sounds like a good idea never heard of it until now

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  16. sounds pretty awesome actually May have to do this on campus.

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  17. This doesn't seem very practical. Basically reinventing the wheel.

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  18. If I were an artist in the music industry, I'd produce all my work and let others have it for free. That isn't to say everyone should abide by my outlook, though.

    This tool has too much potential, and people are too focused on the fact that it can aid in theft.

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  19. When the internet becomes privatized or censored, you'll begin seeing devices like this in homes throughout the world.

    If 'they' take away our internet freedoms, we'll make our own damn internet!

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  20. I don't really see any use for this other than semi-secret stash on a campus

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  21. never heard of this til you brought it up, this is why i love blogs! that's pretty neat that you can modify technology like this!

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  22. I'm fine with getting stuff legally.

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  23. haha, how sweet. Keeping the flow of information free!

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  24. is it dangerous? legal-wise, i mean

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  25. Wow, surprised this is the first time I've heard of it. I don't have anything close to the amount of money to create one at the moment, but it seems like it could be interesting to have.

    How illegal is this, however?

    Otherwise, great blog! Looking forward to future updates!

    searchingthehaystack.blogspot.com

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  26. I wish we had these in my classes!

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  27. First time of hearing about this. I would like to know more.

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  28. looks awesome, wish my proffessor was like this haha

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  29. I like being anonymous. This looks like a really good idea.

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  30. This is wonderful information. I always support a free and open internet, and I'm glad there are people out there working to keep it that that.

    Check me out at:
    http://brassdragons.blogspot.com/

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